Medical Alert Devices For Seniors

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These devices are designed to provide a quick and easy way to communicate to the outside world, family members, or emergency medical professionals in the case of a threatening medical emergency, such as a fall, heart attack, or home invasion. In these times of need it is important that the wearer of the medical alert device get immediate response, and these medical devices can provide that care with a simple touch of a button. That kind of security is not only provides mental security but can prolong a seniors independence allowing the senior to remain in the family home. Most of these medical alert devices are really simplistic, and are devices composed of two major components, a home console and a pendant or small device which can be carried on the wrist or waist with an emergency button. If the wearer falls, become injured, or suffers any type of medical emergency they can press the button on their pendant. The button will send an alert to the home console which then sends a call to a customer services representative who will contact a family member or medical responder. The user can create a list of emergence contacts and set an order of importance to be contacted in the case a situation where to occur. medical alert device Range is one of the most important attributes for any user of a medical alert device to look for when shopping for a medical alert device. The range is the distance the wearer can travel away from the home console, and still have the device communication. Many of the best medical alert devices will have ranges up to 1000 feet. At this distance the wearer can safely travel about the distance of one typical city block. So the wearer can visit local friends and neighbors and still be in contact with their safety contacts and home console. Other devices have more limited ranges but most will have at least a150 foot range. The range of the device should match the mobility and life style of the intended wearer. If the wearer is still very mobile and enjoys walks and visits with neighbors they may need a longer range, for those who never leave the home or are bed ridden may not need an extended range. All home medical devices should come with an included base station. Make sure your medical alert device has this included in the package and the home console is not an additional purchase. The pendant is what the user will wear and take with them. All medical alert devices will include this device, though how that device is attached to the wearer may vary. Find out what is the most comfortable and easy way for the wearer to carry the pendant device. Some options of attachment are wristband, waistband, or necklace. Most pendants are waterproof or at least water resistant, but make sure. Time in the bathroom, shower or any exposure to wet surfaces can be very dangerous, you want to ensure that the device can be worn and will be safe if exposed to wet conditions. Make sure that the device has a battery backup included. You never want a situation where you may have loss of power to any part of the home alert device. Some units will include a wall mounted button. This option is not standard, so if that is an important aspect is to be sure to check if that is included. Most home medical alert systems have two way communications, that is the both wearer and the medical response professionals can speak to each other in the case of an emergency. Be sure this option is included it can be very important for the response team to be able to speak to the wearer to ascertain the problem and be sure to send the proper responders in the right amount of time. Some units will have included a check-in service; with this service the responders will regularly check-in with the wearer to ensure that they are o.k. This can be important for patients who may be immobile, or are experiencing mental problems. Some home medical alerts devices will include lock boxes, these are secured external boxes in which keys, identification, or other important items can be stored and accessed by the responders. Some units may also include voice extenders and microphones to ensure clear communication.
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Medical Alert Devices That Can Help Keep Seniors Safe

Since a large percentage of theseseniors are not able to reach out for help when an emergency occurs at home, caregivers for senior citizens benefit from passive connectivity to proactively monitor their loved ones well being in the home 24 hours/day. QMedic, a Boston, MA company, isdeveloping what it claims to be the first ever passive wearable sensing technologythat detects and predicts emergency events in the home, and sends real-time feedback to caregivers when something unusual occurs. This medical alert system warns the caregiver if the user is not wearing the device, fails to get out of bed, or is out of home for extended periods of time. The QMedic system requires the user to wear a waterproof bracelet which has a large button on the top. Sensors in the bracelet can monitor the seniors sleeping habits and gauge physical activity. The button on the bracelet can be pressed in case of an emergency around the house, which contacts the base station, which in turn calls the QMedics 24/7 emergency call center.
For the source article, follow this url – http://www.medgadget.com/2013/10/qmedics-smart-medical-alert-device.html

‘Free’ Medical Alert Device Offers Harm, Not Help

These units come with waterproof “SOS” buttons — typically in the form of a necklace pendent or bracelet — and a base station that connects to her home phone line. At the press of a button, your mom could call and talk to a trained operator through the system’s base station receiver, which works like a powerful speaker phone. The operator will find out what’s wrong and will notify family members, a neighbor, friend or emergency services as needed. If you’re interested in this type of alert, there are literally dozens of services to choose from. One of the most widely used is the Philips Lifeline Medical Alert Service , which costs $35 per month, plus an $82 start-up fee. Phillips also offers a new Auto Alert option (for $48 per month) that has fall detection sensors in the SOS button that can automatically summon help without your mom ever having to press a button. Some other major players in the industry that are a little less expensive (under $30 per month) include: LifeFone , LifeStation , Bay Alarm Medical , Alert1 , LifeGuardian and MedicalAlert . One other unique product worth consideration is the MediPendant which runs under $35 a month.
Please visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jim-t-miller/medical-alert_b_1426923.html for the source article and related media content

Joint Commission Alert: Medical Device Alarm Safety in Hospitals

If you or a loved one needs a medical alert device, get recommendations from your health care provider or a social service agency. When you call companies, ask for documentation about fees before providing payment accounts. Some hospitals and aging services agencies have subsidized programs. But if you don’t qualify, you may need to pay a one-time installation fee of around $100 plus $1 to $2 per day for device rental and monitoring. Other companies require you to purchase the device. You can foil scammers with these five tips: Speak Out!
To visit the source content, go to this website link – ‘Free’ Medical Alert Device Offers Harm, Not Help

QMedic’s Smart Medical Alert Device for Seniors (VIDEO)

guarav QMedics Smart Medical Alert Device for Seniors (VIDEO)

At the press of a button, your mom could call and talk to a trained operator through the system’s base station receiver that works like a powerful speaker phone. The operator will find out what’s wrong, and will notify family members, a neighbor, friend or emergency services as needed. If you’re interested in this type of alert, there are literally dozens of services to choose from. One of the most widely used is the Philips Lifeline Medical Alert Service (lifelinesys.com, 800-380-3111) which costs $35 per month, plus an $82 start-up fee. Phillips also offers a new Auto Alert option (for $48 per month) that has fall detection sensors in the SOS button that can automatically summon help without your mom ever having to press a button. Some other major players in the industry that are a little less expensive (under $30 per month) include: LifeFone (lifefone.com, 877-849-8942), LifeStation (lifestation.com, 877-478-3390), Bay Alarm Medical (bayalarmmedical.com, 877-722-9633), Alert1 (alert-1.com, 888-919-3692), LifeGuardian (lifeguardianmedicalalarms.com, 800-378-2957) and MedicalAlert (medicalalert.com, 800-800-2537). One other unique product worth consideration is the MediPendant (getmedipendant.com, 888-216-0039), which runs under $35 a month.
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Medical alert devices to help seniors

Beyond the Alert, The Joint Commission is considering the possible creation of a National Patient Safety Goal to help health care organizations address this issue. A field review of the proposed Goal occurred in February and the public comments are now under review. The Joint Commission already has numerous accreditation standards in place related to alarm safety. The standards address issues such as leadership, the environment of care, provision of care and staff training and education. The warning about medical device alarms is part of a series of Alerts issued by The Joint Commission. Much of the information and guidance provided in these Alerts is drawn from The Joint Commission’s Sentinel Event Database, one of the nation’s most comprehensive voluntary reporting systems for serious adverse events in health care.
To visit the source article, visit the following website link – http://www.marketwatch.com/story/joint-commission-alert-medical-device-alarm-safety-in-hospitals-2013-04-08

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