Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits

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Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits Due to Remote Pendant Battery Signal Failure

The firm has received one report of a pendant that failed to operate due to a low battery undetected by the base station in Common Area Mode. No injuries have been reported. The recalled Visonic Amber Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) kit enables a user to push a button on a pendant to signal a request for assistance. An Amber kit consists of one wireless pendant worn by the user, one Amber brand base station, generally connected to a phone line, a power supply and backup battery. Base stations are white, rectangular and measure about 9-inches wide by 7-inches deep by 2-inches high with emergency, call and check buttons. The emergency button is red on the Classic model and grey on the SelectX model. Recalled Classic models have catalog number 0-7425 and serial numbers 0408044281 through 4410052723.
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Personal emergency response systems

Recall Summary Name of Product: Visonic Amber Classic and Amber SelectX Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) Kits Hazard: A single Amber Base station set to Common Area Mode will not detect a low battery or dead battery warning signal from the remote pendant that notifies the end user or system administrator to replace the pendant battery. Remedy: Repair Consumer Contact: Visonic at (800) 223-0020 from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at http://www.visonic.com and click on North America and click on Product News under the Solutions & Products tab for more information about the recall. Photos are available at http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/Visonic-Recalls-Amber-Personal-Emergency-Response-System-Kits Recall Details Units: About 24,000 Description: The recalled Visonic Amber Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) kit enables a user to push a button on a pendant to signal a request for assistance. An Amber kit consists of one wireless pendant worn by the user, one Amber brand base station, generally connected to a phone line, a power supply and backup battery. Base stations are white, rectangular and measure about 9-inches wide by 7-inches deep by 2-inches high with emergency, call and check buttons. The emergency button is red on the Classic model and grey on the SelectX model. Recalled Classic models have catalog number 0-7425 and serial numbers 0408044281 through 4410052723.
See Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits Due to Remote Pendant Battery Signal Failure for the original story and relevant media content

FTC – Personal Emergency Response Systems

Mobile systems For active seniors on-the-go, who drives, play golf, or travel there is a new affordable PERS solutions that connects with their mobile phone. GreatCall , the mobile phone provider of the Jitterbug handset is the first company to provide a mobile PERS solution with the 5Star Urgent Response system . The system provides a wireless call-button that will connect them directlyto a GreatCall emergency response agent or 911. The portable button can hang on a keychain, belt clip or be carried in a purse or jacket pocket. In addition to the mobile PERS, GreatCall has created some easy to use mobile apps for health and safety by providing a range of tools, such as medication management, symptom checkers and professional health advice, all available on an iPhone or Android. The Med Coach app will provide daily pill medication reminders and automatic refills. The Live Nurse app is the ability to call a nurse 24/7 for health advice no appointment necessary. Subscribe to the Techlicious Daily Email!
For the source article please visit the following weblink – Guide to Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS)

ACOs driving interest in personal emergency response systems

is betting on it. Among other products, the telemedicine systems company makes little devices that elderly patients can wear at home. The devices can establish direct communication links when needed or even detect falls and notify the right people when the patient can’t speak. They also can pipe other useful patient home-monitoring stats into electronic health record systems on the provider side. Tim Smokoff In this podcast, CEO Tim Smokoff discusses interoperability between EHRs and home-monitoring devices , as well as overall trends in personal emergency response technology and adoption. While he’s seen tenfold growth in provider and payer interest in the devices in the last year as accountable care organizations launch throughout the United States, Numera’s top category of customers is private buyers who want to help keep track of elderly relatives while keeping them out of nursing homes. Let us know what you think about the story; email Don Fluckinger, news director , or contact @DonFluckinger on Twitter.
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Guide to Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS)

GreatCall 5Star

This feature, therefore, looks at the development of PERS, what exactly they do and how they can in certain instances be a lifesaver. Background and development To me the impact of this innovation will be similar to that in the 1850s when in the USA Edwin Holmes coupled a spring to a door, and connected this to an electrical circuit and a bell, thus resulting in the first household alarm. This technology was later purchased by the Telephone and Telegraphic Service in the USA and become the worlds fist monitored alarm system. Things however have moved on a bit since then. The background to PERS lies in the development of social alarms in the UK.
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What kind of training does the center staff receive? What procedures does the center use to test systems in your home? How often are tests conducted? The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit http://www.ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261.
To visit the source article please follow this website link – FTC – Personal Emergency Response Systems

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