High-tech Gadgets Monitor Seniors’ Safety At Home

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Fire safety grants announced for programs for students, seniors

One study found that after a year, residents who agreed to be monitored were functioning better than an unmonitored control group, presumably because nurses intervened sooner at signs of trouble, Rantz said. The bigger question is whether simply alerting a loved one, not a nurse, might also help. Now, with a new grant from the National Institutes of Health, Rantz will begin expanding the research to see how this monitoring works in different senior housing and this time, participants can decide if they’d like a family member or friend to get those alerts, in addition to a nurse. Rantz says embedding sensors in the home is important because too many older adults forget or don’t want to wear those older emergency-call buttons including Rantz’s own mother, who lay helpless on her floor for eight hours after tripping and badly breaking a shoulder. Rantz said her mother never fully recovered, and six months later died. “When we started this team, I said we are not going to make anybody wear anything or push any buttons, because my mother refused and I don’t think she’s any different than a lot of other people in this world,” Rantz said. Monitoring raises important privacy questions, about just what is tracked and who has access to it, cautioned Jeff Makowka of AARP.
Please visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/10/gadgets-seniors-safety/2505577/ for the originating report and associated media content

Safety for seniors

Anne M. Gobi, D-Spencer; Sen. Stephen M. Brewer, D-Barre, and Rep. Todd M. Smola, R-Warren, joined Gov. Deval L.
Source: Fire safety grants announced for programs for students, seniors

Panel discussion on senior safety Jan. 14 in Sudbury

* Have handrails installed on outside walls for frequently used walkways. * If you use a cane or walker, check the rubber tips to make sure they are not worn smooth. In winter, seasonal affective disorder can occur in seniors and impact their emotional health. Some signs to watch for with SAD include: a loss of energy, an increased appetite and an enhanced feeling of lethargy and tiredness. If symptoms are present, talk to your medical provider about treatment options. Additionally, winter storms can be unpredictable.
Please visit Seniors: Brush up on winter safety for the original story and associated media content

Monitoring gadgets

Seniors, the Council on Aging, the Plymouth police and fire departments, the Plymouth County Sheriffs Department, and the Plymouth County District Attorneys office are determined to reintroduce a proactive approach to senior safety. The TRIAD program, a community policing initiative, strives to protect seniors from crime through education and awareness of other programs for seniors. Were here to serve a purpose senior safety, TRIAD and Friends of the Plymouth Council on Aging member Pat Achorn said. With Interim Elder Affairs Director Connie DiLego on board, a group met Thursday morning to jumpstart the program in Plymouth. Communities with TRIAD establish a Seniors And Law enforcement Together (SALT) Council to help protect its seniors from scams and other threats to their financial and emotional safety. DiLego said there has always been a need for a program like TRIAD to give seniors the information they need to stay safe, and with the population of seniors expanding, its more important than ever. Its vital to our community because of the number of seniors in the community, she said.
To view the original report with any related media, go to Safety for seniors

Seniors: Brush up on winter safety

Panelists will include Sudbury Police Chief Scott Nix, Katie Galenius, director of women’s programs at Greater Lynn Social Services Inc., and Marissa Hamilton, protective services worker at Minuteman Senior Services. For people unable to attend this discussion, a similar one will be held at the Wayland Council on Aging at Wayland Town Hall on Wednesday, Jan. 15, at 10:30 a.m. The Sudbury-Wayland-Lincoln Domestic Violence Roundtable invites the public to a panel discussion about abuse and scams against senior citizens. The free event will be on Tuesday, Jan. 14, at 7 p.m. at the Community Meeting Room at Goodnow Library in Sudbury. Panelists will include Sudbury Police Chief Scott Nix, Katie Galenius, director of women’s programs at Greater Lynn Social Services Inc., and Marissa Hamilton, protective services worker at Minuteman Senior Services.
For the source story please visit this weblink – http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x800891157/Panel-discussion-on-senior-safety-Jan-14-in-Sudbury

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